This Journal is indexed and abstracted in
Kafkas Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi 2020 , Vol 26 , Issue 5
Neutrophils: A Critical Participator in Common Diseases of Ruminants
Si-Lu NI1, Fei GAO1, Chen-Xiang ZUO1, Xi-Dian TANG1, Ming-Jie LIU, Jian-Jun CHANG2, Yong WANG2, De-Kun CHEN1, Wen-Tao MA1
1Veterinary Immunology Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi Province, CHINA
2State Key Laboratory of Plateau Ecology and Agriculture, Qinghai University, Xining 810016, Qinghai Province, CHINA
3College of Agriculture and Animal Husbandry, Qinghai University, Xining 810016, Qinghai Province, CHINA
DOI : 10.9775/kvfd.2020.24012 Neutrophils, pivotal effector cells involved in innate immunity, play a central role in various infectious and inflammatory diseases. Using a powerful phagocytic killing mechanism, these cells protect the host by destroying the invading pathogens. However, these cells can also cause varying degrees of tissue damage if their activation is not finely controlled. In recent years, the involvement of neutrophils in human diseases has been extensively studied, while their roles in ruminant diseases have rarely been investigated. In the present review, we mainly summarize current knowledge regarding the characteristics and functions of neutrophils in ruminants such as goats and cattle. We emphasize the involvement of these cells in several common diseases such as mastitis, Brucellosis, Mycoplasma bovis infection and parasitic infections, among others. We also focus on discussing the relevant mechanisms and signaling pathways underlying these observations. In addition, we compare the phenotypes and functions of neutrophils of different ruminant species. The studies about ruminant neutrophils should help elucidate the pathogenesis of many ruminant diseases and ultimately shed light on the development of novel therapeutics for these diseases. Keywords : Neutrophils, Protective immunity, Tissue damage, Ruminant disease, Immunotherapy